Melanau, or A-Likou, means river people in Mukah dialect. The current name of Melanau was given by one of the Sultans of Brunei in the 19th century. Connect with this fascinating tribe who were among the earliest settlers in the Sarawak region.

  • 9

    Days

  • S America

  • Tropical

  • Casual

  • 5

The Cofan, named after the Cofa Na’e (“Important river”) or Aguarico River, also known as the a’i (“Human”), are the last surviving remnants of the native tribes of the Amazon basin. They live in harmony with the forest, masters and keepers of it’s secrets. Since oil and gold were discovered in their lands almost a century ago, the area has been devastated by western companies and the fragile ecosystem endangered. Today, the Cofan are fighting for their rights to protect their traditional lands and culture.

  • 6

    Days

  • S America

  • Tropical

  • Medium

  • 5

Discover one of Ameridian’s main ethnic groups, Mapuche—‘mapu’ meaning ‘of the land’ and ‘che’ meaning ‘people’. The Mapuche are fearless defenders of their territory and traditions; hunting and harvesting their holy lands and praising the spiritual gods through celebrations of music and storytelling.

  • 8

    Days

  • S America

  • Mild

  • Medium

  • 5

Venture across the oases and valleys of the Atacama salt basin and Loa River and learn to live off the land like the Atacameños do. The Atacameños are also known as apatamas, alpatamas, kunzas, likan-antai or likanantaí which translates to 'the inhabitants of the land’. For years the communities have made the northwest of Argentina, Chile and Bolivia their homes.

  • 7

    Days

  • S America

  • Arid

  • Medium

  • 5

Venture across the Chiloe Archipielago in the Chilean Pacific coast to meet the distant discentents of the Chono people. The Archipelago gives them their current name. Chiloé comes from the Mapuche word chillwe, meaning "seagull place". The first human settlers on Chiloé Island came to the island around 12,000 BC, and they were followed by the nomadic ethnic group called Chono. Their population went extinct in the late 1800s and a branch of the Mapuche people, called the Huilliche, settled on the island. Today, there are around 150,000 people living on the islands, especially in the capital city Castro. Fishing remains a popular industry on the island today, but tourism is also starting to become an important source of income for local people.

  • 9

    Days

  • S America

  • Mild

  • Casual

  • 5

Wander the plains, guarded solemnly by the peaks of the Andes. This is the ancestral home of the remarkable Pehuenche people. The Pehuenche (sometimes Pewenche) get their name from the seed of the monkey puzzle tree, which has been their primary food source for generations.

  • 8

    Days

  • S America

  • Mild

  • Medium

  • 5

Experience stunning festivals full of dance, music, color, and costumes as you delve into the culture of these South American warriors. The Yampara are a social-political group spanning across a number of towns. Established before the Spanish colonization and the main ethnic group within Bolivia, they’re now rebuilding their ancestral originality.

  • 9

    Days

  • S America

  • Mild

  • Medium

  • 5

Isla Amantani, Isla Taquile, Distrito de Atuncolla, Distrito de Capachica, Comunidad de Luquina Chico, Chucuito and the floating Islands of the Uros, are just some of the communities living on the Lake Titicaca in Southern Peru. From different cultural origins and historical backgrounds, some populations identify themselves as Quechua, Uros, Puno or Aymara. Their millennial traditional knowledge and culture are expressed in their textiles, gastronomy and traditions. Each community celebrates their culture with pride and social responsibility to preserve the ancient culture of their ancestors. The incredible lake of Titicaca is the home to millennial history, culture, lifestyle and community.

  • 3

    Days

  • S America

  • Tropical

  • Intense

  • 5

The Mosetén are a population of horticulturalists living in the Bolivian lowlands. They are one of the 36 pueblos indígenas recognized by the Plurinational State of Bolivia. Members of this community live in three the departments called Beni, La Paz, and Cochabamba. They are also owners of two areas of protected tribal lands called the Tierras Comunitarias de Origen. Government censuses estimate that there are approximately 8,000 members of the Mosetén tribe (Pueblo Indígena Mosetén). They have close historical connections with the neighboring community called Tsimane, they share the official language and subsistence practices of mixed horticulture, hunting, fishing, and gathering.

  • 4

    Days

  • S America

  • Tropical

  • Intense

  • 5