Indigenous Handicrafts to keep for yourself; What to Pack Back Home!

In previous articles, we have highlighted packing essentials when visiting unique destinations; Today, we'll be shedding light on what to bring home. Souvenirs not only give you a chance to remember some of the most treasured moments of your experience, but they are also a great way to contribute to the local handicrafts economy, and it is one of the best ways to give back to the community. Articrafts and locally made products are often unique and irreplaceable, generally impossible to find anyw

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Teeth sharpening was done for various reasons among African tribes. For some, the ritual was done to initiate young boys and girls who had reached puberty into adulthood. For these people, it was done during the adulthood rites of passage mainly because at that age they would be able to endure the pain to show that they were indeed ready for adulthood this was mainly among tribes in Congo and the Central African Republic and Gabon.For other tribes, the teeth sharpening ritual was a general part of their custom and any person belonging to such a tribe was expected to have sharpened teeth at an expected age. In parts of Sudan, where indigenous tribes existed, the teeth sharpening ritual was also done for spiritual protection especially when one was seeking spiritual strength or chosen as a spiritual leader.  Other reasons for the teeth sharpening trend is for men to look like animals such as the crocodile as a sign of masculinity. This is a common belief among the Pare people in Tanzania. Several other tribes like the Makonde people performed the teeth sharpening ritual to make their people more beautiful. Among these people, more women had their teeth sharpened and were a symbol of beauty.The teeth sharpening ritual was not done by just anybody as it required great skill and patience to prevent injuring a person while the ritual happened. The sharpening was done by chosen men or women who were believed to be born with the skill gifted to them by the gods and they were able to train chosen people to help them.

Teeth sharpening was done for various reasons among African tribes. For some, the ritual was done to initiate young boys and girls who had reached puberty into adulthood. For these people, it was done during the adulthood rites of passage mainly because at that age they would be able to endure the pain to show that they were indeed ready for adulthood this was mainly among tribes in Congo and the Central African Republic and Gabon.For other tribes, the teeth sharpening ritual was a general part of their custom and any person belonging to such a tribe was expected to have sharpened teeth at an expected age. In parts of Sudan, where indigenous tribes existed, the teeth sharpening ritual was also done for spiritual protection especially when one was seeking spiritual strength or chosen as a spiritual leader.  Other reasons for the teeth sharpening trend is for men to look like animals such as the crocodile as a sign of masculinity. This is a common belief among the Pare people in Tanzania. Several other tribes like the Makonde people performed the teeth sharpening ritual to make their people more beautiful. Among these people, more women had their teeth sharpened and were a symbol of beauty.The teeth sharpening ritual was not done by just anybody as it required great skill and patience to prevent injuring a person while the ritual happened. The sharpening was done by chosen men or women who were believed to be born with the skill gifted to them by the gods and they were able to train chosen people to help them.

Before Aboriginal people populated the Australian continent some 40,000 to 60,000 years ago, the major cause of fires would have been lightning. Aboriginal people learnt to harness the naturally recurring fire caused by lightning and other sources to their advantage, which resulted in skilful burning of landscapes for many different purposes. Fire was used to: make access easier through thick and prickly vegetation, maintain a pattern of vegetation to encourage new growth and attract game for hunting and encourage the development of useful food plants, for cooking, warmth, signalliand spiritual reasons.Early European explorers and settlers commented on the Aboriginal people’s familiarity with fire, and the presence of fire in the landscape continually throughout the year. Most of the fires were relatively low intensity and did not burn large areas.This constant use of fire by Aboriginal people as they went about their daily lives most likely resulted in a fine grained mosaic of different vegetation and fuel ages across the landscape. As a result, large intense bushfires were uncommon
Fire is a significant part of Aboriginal culture and the knowledge of its use has been retained by many Aboriginal families as their culture and values are shared between generations.

Before Aboriginal people populated the Australian continent some 40,000 to 60,000 years ago, the major cause of fires would have been lightning. Aboriginal people learnt to harness the naturally recurring fire caused by lightning and other sources to their advantage, which resulted in skilful burning of landscapes for many different purposes. Fire was used to: make access easier through thick and prickly vegetation, maintain a pattern of vegetation to encourage new growth and attract game for hunting and encourage the development of useful food plants, for cooking, warmth, signalliand spiritual reasons.Early European explorers and settlers commented on the Aboriginal people’s familiarity with fire, and the presence of fire in the landscape continually throughout the year. Most of the fires were relatively low intensity and did not burn large areas.This constant use of fire by Aboriginal people as they went about their daily lives most likely resulted in a fine grained mosaic of different vegetation and fuel ages across the landscape. As a result, large intense bushfires were uncommon
Fire is a significant part of Aboriginal culture and the knowledge of its use has been retained by many Aboriginal families as their culture and values are shared between generations.

Travel Tips

Have you ever heard about the Newar people? They are the original inhabitants of Kathmandu valley in Nepal and the creators of the historic heritage and civilization of this beautiful region. Let’s discover together where they live, what they eat and some curiosities about their traditional habits. You will, for sure, consider the idea of visiting them and experience a life-changing journey! Newars and their wonderful habitat The Newari are a mixed ethnic minority of Tibetans and Indians who,

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Memories of my trip to the Edge of the World, one of the most amazing landscapes in Saudi Arabia. Also known as Jebel Fihrayn, it is an unexpected and dramatic geological wonder in the rocky desert northwest of Riyadh, that has witnessed for millennia the passing of countless ancient tribes.

#wewilltravelagainsoon #saudiarabia #lifechangingexperiences

Memories of my trip to the Edge of the World, one of the most amazing landscapes in Saudi Arabia. Also known as Jebel Fihrayn, it is an unexpected and dramatic geological wonder in the rocky desert northwest of Riyadh, that has witnessed for millennia the passing of countless ancient tribes. 

#wewilltravelagainsoon #saudiarabia #lifechangingexperiences

Documentaries

Konso Cultural Landscape: Terracing and Moringa

Copyright - Konso Cultural Centre. Find out more checking out the Konso people in our tribes section. A presentation of the cultural landscape inscribed in the world heritage list by Unesco.

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