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When we talk about health and medicine, we are often referring to a general, westernized concept of the term.But what does it mean for indigenous peoples? What is their approach to medicine and healthcare? Here, we look at some of their traditional knowledge and discover the range of long-established practices still being used across Africa, America, Canada and Australia.... read the full article  https://www.nomadictribe.com/discover/items/25

When we talk about health and medicine, we are often referring to a general, westernized concept of the term.But what does it mean for indigenous peoples? What is their approach to medicine and healthcare? Here, we look at some of their traditional knowledge and discover the range of long-established practices still being used across Africa, America, Canada and Australia.... read the full article  https://www.nomadictribe.com/discover/items/25

When we talk about health and medicine, we are often referring to a general, westernized concept of the term.But what does it mean for indigenous peoples? What is their approach to medicine and healthcare? Here, we look at some of their traditional knowledge and discover the range of long-established practices still being used across Africa, America, Canada and Australia.... read the full article  https://www.nomadictribe.com/discover/items/25

When we talk about health and medicine, we are often referring to a general, westernized concept of the term.But what does it mean for indigenous peoples? What is their approach to medicine and healthcare? Here, we look at some of their traditional knowledge and discover the range of long-established practices still being used across Africa, America, Canada and Australia.... read the full article  https://www.nomadictribe.com/discover/items/25

The  Kalash people followed a simple life, mostly dependent on agriculture and cattle rearing. Buckwheat and other crops were grown in the river valleys. Surrounding orchards provided fruits of various kinds. Milk from the cattle was used to make ghee, butter and cheese. Wine was made from grapes. Food was cooked over wood-fired ovens. They followed a nature-oriented faith, which later some researchers equated with animistic form of worship while others found similarities with ancient Hindu concepts.The Kalash follow various social customs and rituals. One of them that has been much discussed is the custom of sending menstruating as well as pregnant women to the ‘bashaleni’, a dorm-style building far from the main village. Modern interpreters of culture often refer to it as a form of oppression. But according to Kalash people, it is the women who handle the bulk of everyday work; the time out in the bashaleni is to give the women rest from the daily chores.

The  Kalash people followed a simple life, mostly dependent on agriculture and cattle rearing. Buckwheat and other crops were grown in the river valleys. Surrounding orchards provided fruits of various kinds. Milk from the cattle was used to make ghee, butter and cheese. Wine was made from grapes. Food was cooked over wood-fired ovens. They followed a nature-oriented faith, which later some researchers equated with animistic form of worship while others found similarities with ancient Hindu concepts.The Kalash follow various social customs and rituals. One of them that has been much discussed is the custom of sending menstruating as well as pregnant women to the ‘bashaleni’, a dorm-style building far from the main village. Modern interpreters of culture often refer to it as a form of oppression. But according to Kalash people, it is the women who handle the bulk of everyday work; the time out in the bashaleni is to give the women rest from the daily chores.

During my trip with Nomadic Tribe to live with the Nenets in Siberia I discovered that the clothes made by the tribe protected me more from the cold - around minus 30 degrees C - than the toughest adventure clothing I had brought from home. In the photo wearing the Malitsa, which is a Nenet coat made of around 4 reindeer skins -the fur being closest to the skin on the inside and the blue fabric on the outside-. ​@The Nenet​ #siberia #adventure

During my trip with Nomadic Tribe to live with the Nenets in Siberia I discovered that the clothes made by the tribe protected me more from the cold - around minus 30 degrees C - than the toughest adventure clothing I had brought from home. In the photo wearing the Malitsa, which is a Nenet coat made of around 4 reindeer skins -the fur being closest to the skin on the inside and the blue fabric on the outside-. ​@The Nenet​ #siberia #adventure

The Philippines consist of numerous upland and lowland indigenous ethnolinguistic groups living in the country, with Austronesian making up the overwhelming majority, while full or partial Australo-Melanesians scattered throughout the archipelago. The highland Austroneians and Australo-Melanesians have co-existed with their lowland Austronesian kin and neighbor groups for thousands of years in the Philippine archipelago. The primary difference is that they were not absorbed by centuries of Spanish and United States colonization of the Philippines, and in the process have retained their customs and traditions. Culturally-indigenous peoples of northern Philippine highlands can be grouped into the Igorot (comprising many different groups) and singular Bugkalot groups, while the non-Muslim culturally-indigenous groups of mainland Mindanao are collectively called Lumad. Australo-Melanesian groups throughout the archipelago are termed Aeta, Ita, Ati, Dumagat, among others. Numerous culturally-indigenous groups also live outside these two indigenous corridors.[1]There are 134 ethnic groups in the Philippines, the majority of which are indigenous, though much of the overall Philippine population is constituted by only 8-10 lowland ethnic groups.

The Philippines consist of numerous upland and lowland indigenous ethnolinguistic groups living in the country, with Austronesian making up the overwhelming majority, while full or partial Australo-Melanesians scattered throughout the archipelago. The highland Austroneians and Australo-Melanesians have co-existed with their lowland Austronesian kin and neighbor groups for thousands of years in the Philippine archipelago. The primary difference is that they were not absorbed by centuries of Spanish and United States colonization of the Philippines, and in the process have retained their customs and traditions. Culturally-indigenous peoples of northern Philippine highlands can be grouped into the Igorot (comprising many different groups) and singular Bugkalot groups, while the non-Muslim culturally-indigenous groups of mainland Mindanao are collectively called Lumad. Australo-Melanesian groups throughout the archipelago are termed Aeta, Ita, Ati, Dumagat, among others. Numerous culturally-indigenous groups also live outside these two indigenous corridors.[1]There are 134 ethnic groups in the Philippines, the majority of which are indigenous, though much of the overall Philippine population is constituted by only 8-10 lowland ethnic groups.

Chin tribe is best known of the intricate ink details covering their entire face. This tradition started for generations ago when several tribes in the Chin province of Myanmar began to tattoo the face of each and every single young woman. The Chin parents, in an attempt to protect their daughters, started tattooing their young child’s face.

Over the years, what was originally intended to make the women undesirable began to have another opposite effect. The full facial tattoos became signs of beauty for every Chin women of the old generation. The tattooing became a thoroughgoing tradition, not only deeply entrenched in the local culture but also appeared to be something that most of Chin women are proud of and Each area of Chin state has a distinct tattoo pattern so it is usually possible to determine where a woman comes from by the look of the tattoo on her face. This kind of ancillary information makes my journey to Myanmar visiting the hill tribes become much more meaningful and well worthy than I have ever expected it to be. Nowadays, the practice of facial tattoo is no longer permitted by the Burmese authorities nor it is favored by the younger generation hence this part of the Chin culture, sadly, will soon be gone.

Photo by:Marco Vendittelli

Chin tribe is best known of the intricate ink details covering their entire face. This tradition started for generations ago when several tribes in the Chin province of Myanmar began to tattoo the face of each and every single young woman. The Chin parents, in an attempt to protect their daughters, started tattooing their young child’s face.


Over the years, what was originally intended to make the women undesirable began to have another opposite effect. The full facial tattoos became signs of beauty for every Chin women of the old generation. The tattooing became a thoroughgoing tradition, not only deeply entrenched in the local culture but also appeared to be something that most of Chin women are proud of and Each area of Chin state has a distinct tattoo pattern so it is usually possible to determine where a woman comes from by the look of the tattoo on her face. This kind of ancillary information makes my journey to Myanmar visiting the hill tribes become much more meaningful and well worthy than I have ever expected it to be. Nowadays, the practice of facial tattoo is no longer permitted by the Burmese authorities nor it is favored by the younger generation hence this part of the Chin culture, sadly, will soon be gone.



Photo by:Marco Vendittelli

Sumazau dance  of the Dusun people is the traditional dance of Kadazandusun. Usually, the sumazau dance is performed by a pair of men and women dancers wearing traditional costumes. Sumazau dance is usually accompanied by the beats and rhythms of seven to eight gongs. 

The opening movement for sumazau dance is the parallel swing of the arms back and forth at the sides of the body, while the feet springs and move the body from left to right. Once the opening dance moves are integrated with the gong beats and rhythms, the male dancer will chant "heeeeee!" indicating that it is time to change the dance moves. 

Upon hearing this chant, dancers will raise their hands to the sides of their body and in line with their chest, and move their wrists and arms up and down resembling the movement of a flying bird. There is plenty of choreography of sumazau dance, but the signature dance move of the sumazau will always be the flying bird arms movement, parallel arms swinging back and forth at the sides of the body, and the springing feet.

Sumazau dance  of the Dusun people is the traditional dance of Kadazandusun. Usually, the sumazau dance is performed by a pair of men and women dancers wearing traditional costumes. Sumazau dance is usually accompanied by the beats and rhythms of seven to eight gongs. 


The opening movement for sumazau dance is the parallel swing of the arms back and forth at the sides of the body, while the feet springs and move the body from left to right. Once the opening dance moves are integrated with the gong beats and rhythms, the male dancer will chant "heeeeee!" indicating that it is time to change the dance moves. 


Upon hearing this chant, dancers will raise their hands to the sides of their body and in line with their chest, and move their wrists and arms up and down resembling the movement of a flying bird. There is plenty of choreography of sumazau dance, but the signature dance move of the sumazau will always be the flying bird arms movement, parallel arms swinging back and forth at the sides of the body, and the springing feet.
Sumazau dance  of the Dusun people is the traditional dance of Kadazandusun. Usually, the sumazau dance is performed by a pair of men and women dancers wearing traditional costumes. Sumazau dance is usually accompanied by the beats and rhythms of seven to eight gongs. 


The opening movement for sumazau dance is the parallel swing of the arms back and forth at the sides of the body, while the feet springs and move the body from left to right. Once the opening dance moves are integrated with the gong beats and rhythms, the male dancer will chant "heeeeee!" indicating that it is time to change the dance moves. 


Upon hearing this chant, dancers will raise their hands to the sides of their body and in line with their chest, and move their wrists and arms up and down resembling the movement of a flying bird. There is plenty of choreography of sumazau dance, but the signature dance move of the sumazau will always be the flying bird arms movement, parallel arms swinging back and forth at the sides of the body, and the springing feet.

The Powwow, is a celebration of American Indian culture in which people from diverse indigenous nations gather for the purpose of dancing, singing, and honouring the traditions of their ancestors. The term powwow, which derives from a curing ritual, originated in one of the Algonquian nations of the Northeast Indians. It is a a dance of renewal for restoration of right relationships and healing of all creation

The Powwow, is a celebration of American Indian culture in which people from diverse indigenous nations gather for the purpose of dancing, singing, and honouring the traditions of their ancestors. The term powwow, which derives from a curing ritual, originated in one of the Algonquian nations of the Northeast Indians. It is a a dance of renewal for restoration of right relationships and healing of all creation
The Powwow, is a celebration of American Indian culture in which people from diverse indigenous nations gather for the purpose of dancing, singing, and honouring the traditions of their ancestors. The term powwow, which derives from a curing ritual, originated in one of the Algonquian nations of the Northeast Indians. It is a a dance of renewal for restoration of right relationships and healing of all creation

While the Huli tribe are fearsome warriors and hunters, women and men both have a soft spot for their hair as men wear floral arrangements and dye their beards, with blood-red paint and yellow faces to intimidate their enemies.
Men and women live and sleep in separate houses. Boys will usually stay with their mother until around 12 years of age, before joining the other men and sleeping in their houses. The women in the village are also responsible for making bags for other women in the village.

While the Huli tribe are fearsome warriors and hunters, women and men both have a soft spot for their hair as men wear floral arrangements and dye their beards, with blood-red paint and yellow faces to intimidate their enemies.
Men and women live and sleep in separate houses. Boys will usually stay with their mother until around 12 years of age, before joining the other men and sleeping in their houses. The women in the village are also responsible for making bags for other women in the village.

The Tujia people in China has a tradition that one month before the wedding ceremony, the bride must cry every one hour in every day. This is a sign of  expressing joy and happiness about the upcoming event. One week later, mother of the bride will join her, then her grandmother and by noon of the wedding day, all the female relatives will end up sitting and crying together in different tones.

The Tujia people in China has a tradition that one month before the wedding ceremony, the bride must cry every one hour in every day. This is a sign of  expressing joy and happiness about the upcoming event. One week later, mother of the bride will join her, then her grandmother and by noon of the wedding day, all the female relatives will end up sitting and crying together in different tones.

Crocodile scarification is an ancient initiation practised by the Chambri tribe of Papua New Guinea.Boys as young as 11 in a Papua New Guinean tribe risk their lives to take part in a generations old ritual that pays tribute to the crocodile which leaves them with scale-like skin similar to the water-lurking reptile.

Crocodile scarification is an ancient initiation practised by the Chambri tribe of Papua New Guinea.Boys as young as 11 in a Papua New Guinean tribe risk their lives to take part in a generations old ritual that pays tribute to the crocodile which leaves them with scale-like skin similar to the water-lurking reptile.

A culture for Dayak women includes a belief of beautifying herself. They do it with tattoos and elongating the ears. In Mahakam Ulu, older generations usually have elongated earlobe with silver or iron earrings dangling up to their shoulders. In the past, a Dayak woman with long earlobes will be considered as the most beautiful woman by the people in the village. Earlobe piercing process itself began since childhood. When a baby girl turns to ± 4 years old, her ears will be pierced (locally known as subang) to make her familiar with the piercing so that the hisang – earrings for elongating the earlobes can be worn.

The increasing age is followed by the increasing the number of hisang. When a woman is married, the total hisang could be about 20 pieces in each ear, depending on the social status in her community. The hisang itself is made of silver or bronze which is also adjusted to their social status. The longer it is, the more significant that person is to the tribe.

A culture for Dayak women includes a belief of beautifying herself. They do it with tattoos and elongating the ears. In Mahakam Ulu, older generations usually have elongated earlobe with silver or iron earrings dangling up to their shoulders. In the past, a Dayak woman with long earlobes will be considered as the most beautiful woman by the people in the village. Earlobe piercing process itself began since childhood. When a baby girl turns to ± 4 years old, her ears will be pierced (locally known as subang) to make her familiar with the piercing so that the hisang – earrings for elongating the earlobes can be worn.

The increasing age is followed by the increasing the number of hisang. When a woman is married, the total hisang could be about 20 pieces in each ear, depending on the social status in her community. The hisang itself is made of silver or bronze which is also adjusted to their social status. The longer it is, the more significant that person is to the tribe.